The Citadel

The Military College of South Carolina


Honor The Code

The Citadel Non-Cadet Honor Code

honorcodefor web

 

The Citadel Honor Code for Non-Cadet Students

The Citadel non-cadet honor code is similar in many ways to the cadet version, in that non-cadets do not lie, cheat, steal, nor tolerate those that do. While the protocol is a bit different, as are the potential sanctions, this honor code also extends to cadets who enroll in summer courses at The Citadel. Similarly, students who participate in our joint programs are bound by the code when they enroll in courses on campus. The non-cadet honor code goes went into effect in Fall 2015 and all CGC, EUGS, Day Veteran, Fifth Year, and Active Duty students will follow the guidelines. The details of the honor code can also be found in the Graduate College catalog.

Honor Code Statement: It is the responsibility of all community members to promote, abide by, and enforce the following honor code: “A Citadel non-cadet student (e.g. graduate, evening undergraduate, or veteran) does not lie, cheat, steal, nor tolerate those who do.”

Definition of Terms:

In general, four types of conduct fall under the proposed honor code: lying, cheating, stealing, and the toleration of those who engage in any of these activities.

1) Lying. Defined as any attempt to deceive, falsify, or misrepresent the truth in any matter involving college business. This includes but is not limited to matters involving academic standing, participation in courses, financial information, or any false statements to faculty, staff, administrators, or university officials.

2) Cheating. Defined as taking or attempting to take, or otherwise procure intellectual property in an unauthorized manner; selling, giving, lending, or furnishing to any unauthorized person by a student enrolled in that course, material which can be shown to contain the questions or answers to any exam from any course offered at The Citadel. Academic Dishonesty also includes plagiarism, including fabricating, forging, or falsifying laboratory results or reports, or using work from other courses or from previous assignments for a current class.

The term cheating includes, but is not limited to: 1) the use of sources beyond those authorized by the instructor for written assignments; 2) the use of any unauthorized assistance in taking exams or quizzes; 3) the unauthorized acquisition of tests or other academic material belonging to a faculty or staff member, or student.

The term plagiarism includes, but is not limited to, the use of published or unpublished work of another person without full and clear acknowledgement. It also includes the unacknowledged use of materials prepared by another person or agency engaged in the selling of term papers or other academic material.

3) Stealing. Defined as taking without authority, personal, government, or college property.

4) Toleration. Defined as the failure to report a case of lying, cheating, or stealing as defined above to the proper Honor Council authorities

 

Honor Council Composition:

Faculty: Six members; one from each Academic School and one representative from the Library. Honor Council members are appointed by Graduate Council and serve three-year terms.

Students: Two members: appointed by The Citadel Student Government Association.

Chair: A faculty member elected by members of the Council. Calls meetings, ensures procedures are followed, and is non-voting but casts the deciding vote in the event of a tie.

Training of Honor Council Members: All members are required to participate in a workshop/training seminar on Citadel Honor Code and procedures. Note: this training should be similar in nature to what cadet honor court members receive on procedures and content.

 

Procedures:

Any student, faculty member, or administrator may charge a student with an honor code violation. The procedure for this will consist of the following:

All accused students participating in Honor Council hearings are guaranteed the following rights during a hearing:

  1. The right to a representative. In all college hearings and boards in which a student faces suspension, dismissal or expulsion, the student may be represented by up to two student representatives. Representatives must be students in the same academic program as the student facing disciplinary action, i.e., graduate students or evening undergraduate students may not serve as representatives for cadets, nor may cadets serve as representatives for graduate or evening undergraduate students. Representatives may participate in the board or hearing, including speaking directly to the board or hearing officer and questioning witnesses.
  2. The right to question all witnesses. In cases where the complainant is an alleged victim, accommodations may be made.
  3. The right to present evidence and call witnesses.
  4. The right to decline making any statements or answering questions. In doing so, the Council may draw inferences, either positively or negatively, from such a refusal.
  5. The right to an audio copy of the hearing upon written request.
  6. The right to appeal the decision of the Honor Council.

 

Honor Council Hearing Procedural Guidelines

All student conduct hearings shall be conducted according to the following guidelines except as provided below:

  1. Hearings will be conducted in private.
  2. The complainant, accused student, and their representatives, if any, shall be allowed to attend the entire portion of the hearing at which information is received (excluding deliberations). Admission of any other person to the hearing shall be at the discretion of the Honor Council Chair.
  3. In hearings involving more than one accused student, the Honor Council Chair, at his or her discretion, may permit the hearings concerning each student to be conducted either separately or jointly.
  4. The complainant and the accused student have the right to be assisted by a representative of his or her choosing. Representatives must be students in the same academic program as the student facing disciplinary action, i.e., graduate students or evening undergraduate students may not serve as representatives for cadets, nor may cadets serve as representatives for graduate or evening undergraduate students. Representatives may participate in the board or hearing, including speaking directly to the board or hearing officer and questioning witnesses.
  5. The complainant and the accused student may arrange for witnesses to present pertinent information to the hearing. Witnesses will provide information to and answer questions from the Honor Council.
  6. Pertinent records, exhibits, and written statements may be accepted as information for consideration during the hearing at the discretion of the Honor Council Chair.
  7. All procedural questions are subject to the final decision of the Honor Council Chair.
  8. After the portion of the hearing concludes in which all pertinent information has been received, the Honor Council shall determine whether the accused student is in violation of The Citadel Graduate College Honor Code
  9. The determination shall be made on the basis of a preponderance of the evidence--whether it is more likely than not that the accused student violated the Honor Code. Formal rules or process, procedure, and/or technical rules of evidence, such as applied in criminal or civil court, are not used in these proceedings.
  10. There shall be a single audio recording of all student conduct hearings (not including deliberations). Deliberations should not be recorded. The record shall be the property of The Citadel. If an accused student, with notice, does not appear for a hearing, the information in support of the charges shall be presented and considered even if the accused student is not present.

 

Hearing Protocol

I. Introductions of the participants in the hearing

II. Chair or Administrator Reviews Hearing Process and Procedures

III. Chair or Administrator will confirm charges and statements of responsibility

IV. Complainant/University Calls Witnesses

  1. Complainant asks questions of witnesses
  2. Board/Administrator asks questions of witnesses
  3. Accused student asks questions of witnesses
  4. All parties have opportunity to ask any additional questions

V. Accused Student calls Witnesses

  1. Accused student asks questions of witnesses
  2. Board/Administrator asks questions of witnesses
  3. Complainant asks questions of witnesses

VI. All parties have opportunity to ask any additional questions

All parties have opportunity to ask any additional questions to accused student and/or complainant

VII. Deliberations by Board

Student will be notified in writing via university e-mail, with a hardcopy sent by registered mail, within three business days of the decision.

Range of Sanctions

Note: This list is not exhaustive and may be modified to meet particular circumstances in any given case. All sanctions become a part of student’s official record. Final appeals of Honor Council ruling are made to the President. The procedure for appeals is found in the Campus policies and procedures manual.

  1. Expulsion—Permanent forced withdrawal from The Citadel. Although this may be imposed as a first offense for serious cases, it is usually imposed after other disciplinary methods have not achieved desired result. In all cases in which expulsion is appropriate, the Associate Provost and Dean of the Graduate College will submit documentation and findings to the President of the college for final disposition. The President may elect, at his discretion, to impose another penalty. The student will be notified of the President’s decision and that decision is final. A student’s suspension or expulsion will be noted on the student’s transcripts.
  2. Dismissal—Forced withdrawal from The Citadel for two semesters.
  3. Suspension—Forced withdrawal from The Citadel for a one semester.

In both instances, students may not visit campus or participate in any campus-related activities. An exception to this rule is if the student is seeking clarification of their academic record and a physical visit to campus is required.

  1. Reprimand—Written notice to student that behavior was unacceptable and further issues could result in suspension or expulsion.
  2. Restriction—Loss of privileges including but not limited to parking on campus, access to university facilities, etc.
  3. Course Withdrawal—From the course in which the offense occurred.
  4. Grade Change—Only for cases involving academic integrity. Such a sanction must be approved by the Provost or the Associate Provost and Dean of the Graduate College.
  5. Restitution—Reimbursement for physical damages or loss of property.

Appeals

Grounds. An appeal does not provide a second forum in which to present the case. Appeals deal only with how a decision has been reached and not with the decision itself. The following are the exclusive grounds for all disciplinary and academic appeals:

  1. That the hearing officer or board failed to provide due process;
  2. That significant information has been discovered since the board or hearing, which would probably change the result, but which could not, in the exercise of due diligence, have been presented to the board or hearing.

A review by the President is not considered an entitlement but is within the scope of authority of the President. This is the final appeal at the institution and if applicable, all imposed sanctions are implemented after the President issues his decision.

Back to Top