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Wellness

Courses in this strand focus on how we live a good life, one that is sound morally and physically. Courses in the wellness strand are numbered 304.

Wellness Strand Course Descriptions Spring 2021:

ELES 304-01 “Personal Finance,” Dr. W. Jones, MW 1300-1415 (CRN 15071)

ENGS 304-01 & 02 “The Wellness Revolution,” Dr. Frame, MW 1430-1545 (Section 1 - CRN 14263) TR 1330-1445 (Section 2 – CRN 14720)

HISS 304-01 “History of Pre-Modern Medicine,” Dr. Boughan, MWF 1300-1350 (CRN 14403)
Notions of health and well-being vary over time, across cultures, and within cultures. This course examines medical knowledge and practice in the Latin West, 1000-1600. It also considers more broadly how people in that time and place conceived what it means to live well. A principal focus of this course will be conflicting or competing notions of health and well-being from folk culture, Christian tradition, and elite medical learning.

NTSS 304-01 “Human Diseases,” Dr. Capers, TR 1330-1445 (CRN 14688)

SCSS 304-01 “Sports Psychology,” Dr Nida, MWF 1300-1350 (CRN 15077)
This course will examine a wide range of psychological factors relating to participation in sport and athletic performance, and to physical activity more generally. Particular emphasis will be given to social psychological variables affecting participation and performance and their relationship to the psychological well-being of the individual athlete, to include attention to sports fans and sports marketing. Two key topics addressed in the class – “exercise adherence” and “exercise and well-being” – are particularly reflective of this course’s place within the  Wellness Strand.

Wellness Strand Course Descriptions Fall 2021:

ELES 304-01 & 02, “Personal Finance,” Dr W Jones

ELES 304-01 MWF 0900-0950 (CRN 15189), ELES 304-02 MWF 1000-1050 (CRN 15190)

WHO WANTS TO BE A MILLIONAIRE? Personal Financial Management focuses on the application of basic financial tools and principles to the student’s personal life. Concepts and tools covered include: the financial planning process, liquidity management, debt management, asset management, and risk management. The course will also include retirement education and estate planning. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be prepared to create and manage their own personal financial plan. The primary deliverable at the end of this course and a major component of your final grade is an individual financial plan prepared by each student for themselves.

ENGS 304-01 & 02 “Improvise, Adapt, and Overcome,” Dr Heuston

ENGS 304-01 MWF 0800-0850 (CRN 14878), ENGS 304-02 MWF 0900-0950 (CRN 15242)

This course will examine a wide range of written sources (fiction and nonfiction from the Roman Empire to the present) and films that deal with the central issue of the Wellness Strand: how to live a good life. We will read and discuss selections from classic works of nonfiction (including the Meditations of Marcus Aurelius, Henry David Thoreau’s Walden, Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One's Own, and Viktor Frankl’s Man’s Search for Meaning) and fiction (including Ernest Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea and Tim O’Brien’s The Things They Carried) and films (such as Apocalypse Now, Cast Away, and Little Dieter Needs to Fly) alongside more recent nonfiction texts about facing and overcoming life’s manifold challenges. In addition to developing a familiarity with our course texts, students will become familiar with related research on aspects of wellness they can apply to their own lives.   

HISS 304-01 & 02 “History of Pre-Modern Medicine,” Dr Boughan

HISS 304-01 MWF 1100-1150 (CRN 15199), HISS 304-02 MWF 1300-1350 (CRN 15504)

Notions of health and well-being vary over time, across cultures, and within cultures. This course examines medical knowledge and practice in the Latin West, 1000-1600. It also considers more broadly how people in that time and place conceived what it means to live well. A principal focus of this course will be conflicting or competing notions of health and well-being from folk culture, Christian tradition, and elite medical learning.

NTSS 304-01 MWF 1000-1050 , “An Ounce of Prevention,” Dr Zanin
(CRN 14688)

What does it mean to have a healthy lifestyle? How can choices about things like sleep, diet, and exercise impact one’s chance of getting diabetes, heart disease, mental illness, or cancer? This course will allow students to explore the value of healthy living as it relates to disease prevention and treatment,with focus on some of the worst health problems in our society. Students will study the related organ systems’ normal functions, their malfunctions in disease, and the financial and emotional costs of chronic diseases to individuals, their families, and the healthcare system. Unhealthy habits can be fun, but are they worth the risk?

SCSS 304-03 MWF 1200-1250, “Sports Psychology,” Dr Nida
(CRN 15077)

This course will examine a wide range of psychological factors relating to participation in sport and athletic performance, and to physical activity more generally. Particular emphasis will be given to social psychological variables affecting participation and performance and their relationship to the psychological well-being of the individual athlete, to include attention to sports fans and sports marketing. Two key topics addressed in the class –“exercise adherence” and “exercise and well-being” – are particularly reflective of this course’s place within the Wellness Strand.

SCSS 304-04 TR 1330-1445,”Nature & Nurture in Psychology,” Dr Fernald 
(CRN 15515)

Description coming soon!

SCSS 304-05 TR 0930-1045, "Learners with Exceptionalities, Dr T Graham
(CRN 15645)

This course is designed to educate others about supporting those with disabilities through a focus on social and emotional, academic, and cognitive differences of students with special needs. Students will learn how to collaborate, coach, and teach in diverse workplace environments.

 

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