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Sustainability

Courses in this strand focus on human interactions with nature and the environment. Courses in the sustainability strand are numbered 305.

Sustainability Strand Course Descriptions Spring 2021:

ELES 305-02 “CAD for 3D Printing,” Dr. Skenes, TR 1100-1215 (CRNB 15108)
In this course, students will be introduced to the Computer- Aided Design (CAD) software SolidWorks and will learn how to employ this software to create high-quality parts to be produced via additive manufacturing, or 3D printing. Students will learn how to create virtual 3D parts and build assemblies of multiple parts. The advantages and disadvantages of different methods of 3D printing will be discussed, and practical concerns related to consistently successful 3D printing projects will be explored. Students who complete the course will have a greater understanding of how they can use 3D printing to independently create products for an entrepreneurial venture as well as the sustainable benefits 3D printing offers as a manufacturing method.

ENGS 305-01 & 02 “Capitalism, Socialism, and Sustainability,” Dr. Horan, TR 1100-1215 (Section 1 – CRN 14264) TR 1330-1445 (Section 2 – CRN 14751)
While corporate capitalism is central to contemporary American culture, this course will examine how distinctly American conceptions of socialism challenge, inform, and alter our dominant socioeconomic paradigm. We will explore the portrayal of socialism in American speculative literature, including Edward Bellamy’s phenomenally popular Looking Backward (1888), Jack London’s quasi-Marxian The Iron Heel (1907), and B.F. Skinner’s Walden Two (1948), which delves into the controversial relationship between collectivism and behavioral engineering. We will consider Ayn Rand’s critique of socialism and endorsement of the free market in her dystopian novella Anthem (1938). We will also analyze criticisms of socialism from the left, such as Cedric J. Robinson’s Black Marxism (1983), which questions the European philosophical influence on contemporary leftwing thought. Through a series of activities and assignments, students will connect the concepts and concerns raised in this literature to contemporary questions of sociopolitical, economic, and environmental sustainability.

NTSS 305-01 “Police, Politics, Pollution,” Dr. B. Adair, MWF 1000-1050 (CRN 14689)
Students explore many aspects of chemical creation, distribution, and sources. The importance of natural elements like metals in creating everything from television screens to cars is discussed in terms of the policing needed and politics involved in acquiring, processing, and distributing chemicals throughout the world. Students will learn that implementing sustainable uses and disposal processes of chemicals has been a complex issue throughout history, especially when lives are impacted.

Sustainability Strand Course Descriptions Fall 2021:

ENGS 305-01 & 02 “Capitalism, Socialism, and Sustainability,” Dr. Horan,

ENGS 305-01 TR 1100-1215 (CRN 14885), ENGS 305-02 TR 1330-1445 (CRN 15243)

While corporate capitalism is central to contemporary American culture, this course will examine how distinctly American conceptions of socialism challenge, inform, and alter our dominant socioeconomic paradigm. We will explore the portrayal of socialism in American speculative literature, including Edward Bellamy’s phenomenally popular Looking Backward (1888), Jack London’s quasi-Marxian The Iron Heel (1907), and B.F. Skinner’s Walden Two (1948), which delves into the controversial relationship between collectivism and behavioral engineering. We will consider Ayn Rand’s critique of socialism and endorsement of the free market in her dystopian novella Anthem (1938). We will also analyze criticisms of socialism from the left, such as Cedric J. Robinson’s Black Marxism (1983), which questions the European philosophical influence on contemporary leftwing thought. Through a series of activities and assignments, students will connect the concepts and concerns raised in this literature to contemporary questions of sociopolitical, economic, and environmental sustainability.

HISS 305-01 MWF 1100-1150, “Viking Age Sustainability,” Dr Maddox
(CRN 15200)

The history of sustainability considers man’s use and control of his environment during different historical periods. This use and control can lead to long-term success and/or failure. This course will broadly focus on human interactions with nature and the environment during the Viking Age, c. AD750-1100. Topics to be discussed are land use, travel, belief systems,commerce, city formation and political authority. Regions included in the course are Greenland, Iceland, Ireland, Scandinavia, early England, and Francia.

NTSS 305-01 MWF 0900-0950, “Forest, Fish, & Fowl,” Dr J Gramling
(CRN 15497)

Successfully managing natural resources is a critical requirement for maintaining sustainable forests, fisheries and wildlife populations.  In this course we will explore the underlying science that professionals use to manage natural resources for short-term and long-term human use.  The principles of ecology, population biology, genetics, botany and zoology will be the basis for lectures.  Outdoor activities will be integrated into the course to provide critical insight into natural resource management techniques and the skills needed to be successful professionally.  We will also discuss the state and federal polices used to regulate hunting, fishing and forestry.  The class will culminate in a term project where students present their results on what a sustainable population or habitat looks like for the plant, animal or natural area of their choice, and the management techniques required to maintain this natural resource over time.

NTSS 305,“Extreme Weather and Climate,” Dr S Curtis, 
*This course will be cross listed with PHYS 244.

Hurricanes, floods, tornadoes, heat waves, sea level rise.  The Citadel, much like our nation, is susceptible to these threats, but what causes them and how do they impact the natural and built environment?  Furthermore, how do we mitigate weather and climate hazards to make our communities more livable?  In this introductory course we will explore what makes weather extreme and look into recent events in US history.  We will synthesize the effects rising temperature and extreme weather have on people, property, and sustainability efforts by individuals all the way up to the US military.  Extreme events will be observed and analyzed with real world data, including the Lt Col James B Near Jr., USAF, ’77, Center for Climate Studies weather station on campus.

NTSS 305-02 & 04, “Environmental Science,” Dr Gustafson

NTSS 305-02 TR 1330-1445 (CRN 15498), NTSS 305-04 TR 1100-1215 (CRN 15003) 

Environmental science is the study of how the natural world works, how our environment affects us, and how we affect our environment. Understanding how our actions and inactions affect the world around us is critical to recognizing the type of planet we will leave for future generations. Imagine yourself on a deserted island where you are bound by the resources present,and every decision you make could be crucial to your survival. How would your decisions be different if the island has a growing population, natural resources are not distributed evenly, and you have a democratic form of government? This course is aimed to help you make good decisions on how to stay alive and preserve the resources around you on the island (Earth). This introductory course will address real-world environmental issues and how we can affect positive changes to improve livability and sustainability.

SCSS 305-02 TR 0930-1045, “Comparative Cognition,” Dr Parrish
(CRN 15513)

A critical component to understanding the natural world is to look beyond our own species to those around us, including animal species that we interact with on a daily basis as well as species that inhabit more remote environments. In this course, students will adopt a comparative approach to the study of cognitive psychology, in which we explore the behavior and psychology of animal species. We will investigate the role of environment and evolution in the shaping of animal behavior and cognition and compare those processes to human behavior and cognition. Topic areas include learning,memory, social behavior (cooperation and conflict), tool use, and communication in a variety of species (primates, elephants, birds, dolphins,dogs, etc.) These topics will be situated among discussions of sustainability efforts to better conserve the environments in which these animals inhabit.

SCSS 305-04 TR 1330-1445, “The Future of Sustainability,” Dr Albert
(CRN 15636)

This course provides a hands-on overview of the future of sustainability. Students explore how humanity depends upon the Earth's physical resources and natural systems for food, energy, and water (FEW). Investigations are conducted into how we can best integrate social, ecological, physical and built environments to provide for growing demand for food, energy, and water in the short term while also maintaining appropriate ecosystem services for the future. Students progress through activities to explore these grand challenges, potential solutions, and work hands-on in The Citadel’s Sustainable Farm on campus to grow food for cadets. 

 

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