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Cyber Operations Major

Bachelor of Science in Cyber Operations

Program Contact Information

Dr. Shankar Banik, 843 953-5039, baniks1@citadel.edu
Professor and Head of Department of Cyber and Computer Sciences

Program Mission

The mission of Bachelor of Science program in Cyber Operations is to develop the next generation of cyber leaders who can analyze the security of cyber systems, protect and defend cyber systems, investigate different types of attacks and incidents in cyber systems in the industry, government or military environment. The Citadel has been designated as National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education (CAE-CDE) by National Security Agency and Department of Homeland Security in 2016. The Citadel currently offers B.S. in Computer Science and a minor in Cybersecurity which is the academic path for CAE-CDE. The B.S. in Cyber Operations that will start in Fall 2020, will be a standalone major that will meet the academic standards of Center of Excellence in Cyber Operations program set by National Security Agency. This major is deeply technical and inter-disciplinary program grounded in computer science, computer engineering, and/or electrical engineering disciplines, with extensive opportunities for hands-on applications via labs and exercises. The major is housed in the newly created Department of Cyber and Computer Sciences. 

Program Objectives

Graduates of Bachelor of Science in Cyber Operations will be able to:

  1. Apply security principles and practices to the design and implementation of the physical, software, and human component of the cyber systems,
  2. Analyze and evaluate cyber systems with respect to security,
  3. Identify, analyze, and mitigate threats in the cyber systems.

Employment Opportunities

The United States Bureau of Labor and Statistics estimates a 32% increase in the number of cyber-related positions over the next eight years, with a median salary of $98,350 [1].  Possible career paths include:

·       Cybersecurity Analyst

·       Digital Forensic Analyst

·       Incident Responder

·       Penetration Tester

·       Malware Analyst

·       Threat Analyst

[1] https://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/information-security-analysts.htm

Curriculum

 

 

Fall

 

 

 

Spring

 

 

Course No.

Course Title 

Credit Hours

 

Course No.

Course Title

Credit Hours

Freshman

CSCI 201

Introduction to Computer Science I

3

 

FSEM 101

Freshman Seminar

3

 

CSCI 211

Introduction to Computer Science I Lab

1

 

FSWI 101

Freshman Linked Writing Intensive

3

 

 

 Modern Language

3

 

CSCI 202

Introduction to Computer Science II

3

 

MATH 131

Analytical Geometry and Calculus I 

4

   

Modern Language

3

 

RPED 260

Physical Fitness, Resiliency, and Wellness 

3

 

MATH 132

Analytical Geometry and Calculus II

4

 

LDRS 101

First Year Experience

1

   

1st Year Basic ROTC

1

 

 

 1st Year Basic ROTC

1

       

 

CSCI 227

Principles and Practices of Cybersecurity

3

       

 

             

 

             

Sophomore

ENGL XXX

Strand English

3

 

CSCI 317

Computer Networks and Internet

3

 

CSCI 305

Computer Organizations and Programming

3

 

CSCI 223

Data Structures and Algorithms

3

 

 

Science

4

 

CSCI 320

Database Design

3

 

MATH 206

Discrete Structures

3

   

Science (satisfies Strand Science requirement)

3

 

 

Strand Elective

3

 

STAT 261

Introduction to Probability and Statistics

3

 

LDRS 201

Sophomore Seminar in Principled Leadership

1

 

RPED

Required Physical Education

0

 

 

2nd Year Basic ROTC

   

LDRS 211

Sophomore Seminar Service Learning Lab

0

 

         

2nd Year Basic ROTC

 

 

             

Junior

CSCI 327

Computer Security

3

 

CSCI 409

Malware Analysis

3

 

CSCI 405

Operating Systems

3

 

CSCI 427

Advanced Cybersecurity

3

 

CSCI 408

Software Security

3

 

MATH 302

Applied Cryptography

3

 

 

Strand Social Science

3

 

HIST 30X

Strand History

3

 

 

General Elective

3

 

LDRS 371

Leadership in Organizations

3

 

LDRS 311

Junior Ethics Enrichment Experience

0

   

1st Year Advanced ROTC

 

 

 

1st Year Advanced ROTC

         

 

RPED

Required Physical Education

         

 

             

Senior

CSCI 410

Offensive Cyber Operations

3

 

CSCI 499

Senior Research Project

3

 

CRMJ 401

Cyber Ethics and Policy

3

 

CSCI 411

Cyber Forensics

3

 

ELEC 311

Digital Logic and Circuits

3

 

CSCI 410

Software Security

3

 

CSCI 411

Cyber Forensics

3

 

ELEC 330

Digital Systems Engineering

3

 

 

General Elective

3

   

*Approved Cyber Elective

3

 

 

2nd Year Advanced ROTC

     

2nd Year Advanced ROTC

 

 

LDRS 411

Senior Leadership Integration Seminar

0

 

COMM 260

Technical Writing and Communications

3

*Approved Cyber Electives:

                             CRMJ 392 Cyber Crime

                             CRMJ 331 Cyber Investigations

                             CSCI 490 Special Topics: Cyber Warfare

                             INTL 465 Special Topics: Cyber Intelligence

 

Course Descriptions

CSCI 227: Principles and Practices of Cybersecurity

This course will provide an introduction to concepts related to cybersecurity. Students  will  learn  safe  practices  which  can  be  deployed  to  secure  computer systems.  Students  will  gain  an  understanding  of  different  tools  which  can  be used to defend attacks on computer systems. Special emphasis will be given to systems and applications that cyber users will likely to encounter in daily life. In addition to lecture classes, security lab exercises will be conducted to perform hands-on experiments on safe security practices.

CSCI 201: Introduction to Computer Science I

An introduction to problem solving and algorithm development using Java. Topics include computer organization, operating systems, structured programming, and program modularization. Assignments involve designing, coding, debugging, and documenting computer programs.

CSCI 202: Introduction to Computer Science II

A continuation of the material covered in CSCI 201. This course emphasizes object-oriented programming and a disciplined approach to program development.  Topics include data abstraction, recursion, inheritance, polymorphism, linked data structures, stacks, and queues.

CSCI 223: Data Structures and Algorithms

Formal specification and implementation of abstract data types and analysis of algorithms. Topics include list and set representation methods, sorting, trees and graphs. Data structures used include stacks, queues, binary trees, hash tables, priority queues, and search trees.

 

CSCI 305: Computer Organizations and Programming

An introduction to computer architecture and assembly language programming. Relationship of the conventional machine level of a modern computer system with its other levels. Topics are chosen from addressing; machine instructions; I/O; subroutines; parameters; recursion; stacks; interrupts; number systems and arithmetic; and the physical, digital, and the microprogramming levels.

CSCI 317: Computer Networks and Internet

An introduction to data communications and computer networking. Topics include LAN technologies,  packet  switching  networks,  internetworking of  heterogeneous  network  technologies,  internetworking  protocol  suites  (with emphasis  on  TCP/IP),  the  client/server  paradigm,  the  BSD  Socket  interface, network  security,  and  important  network  applications.

CSCI 320: Database Design

An introduction to the logical and physical structures of computer database systems. Topics include data models, query languages, relational database de-sign, and database constraints. Students will be required to complete a project involving database design and implementation.

CSCI 327: Computer Security

A  survey  of  the  principles  and  practices  related  to  computer  security  emphasizing the problems of security associated with computer networks. Topics include cryptography, privacy, authentication, access control and authorization, security policies, and legal and ethical issues. A significant component of the course  is  the  investigation  of  attacks  commonly  used  by  computer  criminals and strategies that can be used to thwart the attacks.

CSCI 408: Software Security

An introduction to secure software development methodologies, reverse engineering, and software exploitation.  Topics include secure programming principles and practices, source code auditing, fuzzing, binary code analysis, reverse engineering, and exploitation.  A heavy emphasis will be placed on hands-on lab activities to enforce concepts.

 CSCI 409: Malware Analysis

An introduction to malware analysis.  Topics include detection, obfuscation, and static and dynamic analysis techniques.  Students will be introduced to a variety of different malware types, including, but not limited to, interpreted languages, macros, and compiled executables.  A heavy emphasis will be placed on the use of hands-on lab activities to enforce concepts.

 CSCI 410: Offensive Cyber Operations

An overview of the phases involved in an offensive cyber operation.  Special attention will be paid to decision authority/authorization, the cyber kill chain, mission planning, execution, and assessment.  Hands-on labs will be used to demonstrate and enforce concepts.

CSCI 411: Cyber Forensics

An introduction to digital forensics on Windows-based Operating Systems.  Topics include the incident response lifecycle, collecting forensically sound evidence, analyzing memory and filesystems, and report writing.  Hands-on lab assignments will be used extensively to apply concepts.

CSCI 427: Advanced Cybersecurity

This course will cover the techniques used to secure cyber systems. Topics covered will include security policies, computer security management and risk assessment,  secured  network  protocols,  software  security  issues,  ethical  and legal aspects of security, and disaster recovery. Special emphasis will be given to designing, deploying, and managing complete secured cyber systems.

MATH 302: Applied Cryptography

In this course the students will learn about the common cryptographic use, for example:  security functions (data protection, data integrity, authentication, non-repudiation).   The  students  will  learn  about  symmetric  cryptography,  public key cryptography (Diffie-Hellman, RSA, El Gamal), the strength and weaknesses of various  cryptography  models.   Finally,  the  students  will  learn  about  cryptographic failures  including  types  of  attacks  (brute  force,  chosen  plaintext,  known  plaintext, differential and linear cryptanalysis, etc.) and implementation failures.

CRMJ 401: Cyber Ethics and Policy

This course explore the ethics, policies, and legal responses that affect behavior in cyber space with an emphasis on nefarious behavior.  Students  will  explore these topics both from a computer scientist perspective, with an emphasis on computers  and  networks,  as  well  as  a  social  science  perspective,  with  an  emphasis on human behavior in cyberspace.

 

CRMJ 331: Cyber Investigations

This course will introduce the student to the best practices for seizing and securing digital evidence and the complicated legal issues surrounding digital evidence within the area of Cyber-Crime Investigation to include Cyber-Terrorism. The course will cover evidence and issues relative to file Meta-data for various types of electronic devices such as computer networks, cell phones, and electronic storage. Searches justified by exigent circumstances, search incident to arrest, and search warrant issues will also be covered. This course provides students interested in improving their investigative knowledge with an understanding of identifying, quantifying/qualifying, seizing, and protecting electronic information. The  investigative  process  is  studied  from  basic  theoretical  concepts  to  the application  of  the  basic  elements  for  prosecution  of  criminal  cases.  Included are several studies of electronic crime scene investigation, white collar crime, organized crime, and cyber-terrorism. While this class focuses on cyber investigative practices and procedures in the United States, it offers a global perspective and will incorporate examples from different parts of the world.

CRMJ 392: Cyber Crime

An exploration of the current state of computer crime in the United States. The course traces the history of technological crime and identifies areas ripe for exploitation from technology savvy deviants. It also evaluates forensic practices and  software  in  light  of  government  legislation  together  with  an  analysis  of emerging case law. The course also addresses guidelines for the development of computer forensic laboratories, the creation of computer crime task forces, and the search and seizure of electronic equipment.

 

 

 

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