The Citadel

The Military College of South Carolina

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Veronica Barredo

Corps Grad ’08

Veronica BarredoI was born in Mexico and lived in Venezuela for approximately seven years, then moved to the U.S. in 1996. I started my knob year in August of 2004 with Charlie Company, and I graduated in 2008 with a civil engineering degree. I was the youngest cadet for the Class of 2008. I ran track and cross country on-and-off during my time at The Citadel, and I ran my first marathon at 19 years old (junior at The Citadel). To date, I’ve completed 10 full distance marathons and 1 ultra marathon of 50 miles. Currently, I’m training for a 100-mile race (Keys100, to be held in Key West in May 2017). I earned my professional engineering (PE) license last year, and I’m currently working towards my master’s in civil engineering at the University of Central Florida (UCF). In regards to my current professional position, I am the TVA Quality Control Manager for the TVA Boone Dam Project located in Tri-Cities, Tenn. Some of my experience includes work at TVA’s Bear Creek Dam, the Blue Ridge Dam and the Panama Canal expansion project (which was considered one of the biggest projects in the world during its time).

What is your favorite memory from The Citadel?
Most of my favorite memories at The Citadel were developed from my experience going through the Civil Engineering department. My favorite memory was when Col. Dion gave me my final grade for my senior design capstone project. It was the last assignment that had to be submitted to fulfill my requirements for the civil engineering degree. Col. Dion was my favorite professor, and I will never forget the positive impact that he has had in my life.

What about your time at The Citadel had the most positive impact on your career or life?
The civil engineering department prepared me in ways that I could not possible quantify. Even when looking at the most basic influence. The department had a standard format of how to submit homework assignments. The professors enforced the “given – required – solution” format. You first analyze a problem, then list all of the information that was/is given, and then you list what was/is required. Only after that was written, could you begin to attack the problem. I still continue to use the format of “given-required-solution” to organize brainstorm ideas to solve engineering problems.

It is a fair statement to make that I cannot quantity the positive impact that it has had in my career, let alone in my life. The engineering staff successfully trained me and my classmates on how to effectively solve engineering problems. At the end, that’s all we (engineers) are. We are problem solvers, and The Citadel trained us on exactly that.

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