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Citadel News Service
15 Jul 2008

Senior Scholars program takes step back in history this fall

Charleston history takes center stage during this fall’s Citadel Senior Scholars program.

The Senior Scholars Program, under the direction of The Citadel Graduate College, is designed for adults age 55 and older who want continued intellectual and social interaction in a scholastic setting. No formal education is required for membership, but participants are considered non-degree students of The Citadel Graduate College and are authorized to use the library, computer labs, and recreational facilities. They also can attend cultural events and are entitled to student rates for tickets to athletic events.

“Citadel Senior Scholars are life-long learners with a wide variety of interests, ranging from coastal conservation to the current geo-political interactions of the world’s great religions,” said Ray Jones, associate dean of the graduate college. “Our bi-weekly lectures and events are a forum for lively interaction and social exchange of ideas and experiences.”

Joining Senior Scholars costs $35 per semester. For more information call The Citadel Graduate College at 843-953-5089 or send email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

Senior Scholars meets from 2 to 4 p.m. about every other Wednesday during the academic year in Mark Clark Hall. This fall, programming will include overviews of the history of the H.L. Hunley, Fort Moultrie and women and African Americans in Charleston. In addition, coastal conservation and energy efficiency will be discussed.

Sept. 10
Human Impacts on Coastal Wildlife

Al Segars of the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources will discuss the direct and indirect impacts on coastal, estuarine and terrestrial wildlife as the South Carolina coast continues to be developed and how to minimize the negative impact as individuals and as a community.

Sept. 24
The H.L. Hunley

Brian Hicks, a Post and Courier reporter and co-author of “Raising the Hunley: The Remarkable History and Recovery of the Lost Confederate Submarine” will talk about the Confederate submarine Hunley, its history, and ongoing efforts to solve the mystery of why it disappeared in the waning days of the Civil War.

Oct. 8
Fort Moultrie

Rick Hatcher, historian at Fort Sumter National Monument, will outline the history of Fort Moultrie from 1776 through 1947. This 171-year time period will cover the fort as the site of the first major victory in the American Revolution on June 28, 1776, and the replacement of the palmetto log and sand fort by a second Fort Moultrie in 1798. Today, Fort Moultrie, administered as part of Fort Sumter National Monument, is the only place where the history of U.S. seacoast defense is told.

Oct. 22
Energy Efficiency at Home

Art Von Lehe, project manager for the Climate and Energy Program at the Coastal Conservation League, will highlight energy issues in South Carolina. Energy issues must be addressed at all levels, from the national stage to Main Street South Carolina. Local governments are well situated for enacting effective energy efficiency policies because of their smaller size and considerable influence over zoning ordinances, land use patterns, public transportation, transit locations, green space, energy usage, and building codes.

Nov. 5
The History-Shaping Women of Charleston

This presentation will be a factual and entertaining lecture about the role of women throughout Charleston’s history to include daily life, slavery, plantation mistresses, entrepreneurs, artists and writers. Valerie Perry, associate director of museums at the Historic Charleston Foundation will be the speaker.

Nov. 19
African American History in the Lowcountry

Curtis Frank, exhibitions coordinator at the Avery Research Center, shares his experiences from a recent trip to Sierra Leone and Liberia. This presentation will specifically examine the linguistic, food, and folkway connections between Africa’s Rice Coast and the Lowcountry.

Dec. 3
Holiday Celebration

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Media Contact:
Kim Keelor-Parker
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