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Citadel News Service

For Release
Sept. 11, 2003


C
itadel mourns the death of newly appointed BOV member

              Columbia attorney Joe Shine, a 1971 graduate of The Citadel, died suddenly of a heart attack on Wednesday morning. His death comes only a few days after Gov. Mark Sanford had appointed him as the newest member of The Citadel Board of Visitors. He was to replace the seat formerly held by Xavier Starkes, Class of 1984.

Joe Shine in his senior picture.

              Board of Visitors Chairman Billy Jenkinson spoke for all members of the board with the following statement:

              "We are deeply saddened at the death of Joe Shine, Citadel Class of 1971, and offer our condolences to his wife, Judge Margaret Seymour, and his family. As the newest appointee to The Citadel Board of Visitors, he would have attended his first board meeting next weekend.

          "Joe Shine would have brought a vital perspective to the board as our second African-American graduate, an excellent student, cadet leader and highly successful alumnus. Everyone on the board is saddened by the loss of this outstanding alumnus."

          Shine was a history major and honor student who had an Air Force ROTC scholarship and was on regimental staff his senior year. He also was a founding member of the college's African-American Society. After graduating from The Citadel, he entered Harvard Law School where he graduated in 1974. He later earned a master's in business administration from Southern Illinois University and worked in the office of the Secretary of the Air Force.

          Shine was an attorney for the city of Charleston between 1976 and 1987 and then served as South Carolina's chief deputy attorney general from 1987 until 1993 when he became the first legal counsel for the state's Budget and Control Board. He remained with the Budget and Control Board until 2002. At the time of his death, he was general counsel for the Savannah River Site.

           

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