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Citadel News Service

For Release
March 3, 2003

Students to honor the nation's most celebrated
African American historian

         The Citadel's student African American Society will honor Dr. John Hope Franklin, a noted scholar on history and race in America, at noon Wednesday, March 5.

         Franklin will receive a Lifetime Achievement Award and will be named the first honorary member of The Citadel African American Society during a luncheon in Mark Clark Hall.

         "Dr. Franklin is one of the most important African American historians of the 20th century. Having him at The Citadel is a great honor," said Marcus Cox, assistant professor of history.

         Presently the James B. Duke professor emeritus of history at Duke University, Franklin was invited by President Clinton in 1997 to serve as the chair of the advisory board for One America: The President's Initiative on Race. A widely published author, he is perhaps best known for his book "From Slavery to Freedom: A History of African-Americans," now in its seventh edition.

         In 1978 "Who's Who in America" selected Franklin as one of eight Americans who have made significant contributions to society. Among his many other awards are the Organization of American Historians Award for Outstanding Achievement and the Presidential Medal of Freedom. In June 1997, PBS aired "First Person Singular: John Hope Franklin," a film produced by Lives and Legacies Films.

         Franklin is a native of Oklahoma and a graduate of Fisk and Harvard universities.

         "The members of The African American Society believe it is important for us to honor a man who has spent years teaching and conducting research to educate humanity on the true history of blacks," said Cadet Clay Middleton, president of the African American Society and a Charleston resident. "We could not afford to miss the opportunity to meet, hear, and honor a man of his stature."

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