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Citadel News Service

For Release
May 2002

 Cadets remain competitive in tight job market

          Signing bonuses and the competitive perks used just two years ago to lure college grads into the job market are gone now. But Citadel graduates remain a hot commodity with recruiters and employers alike.

          "The Citadel turns out graduates who are very attractive to prospective employers," said Brent Stewart, director of career placement services at The Citadel. "Our seniors are disciplined, well-mannered, know how to work with teams and do not fall apart under pressure."

          Stewart concedes that the job market is the tightest he has seen in the last decade. Yet, The Citadel is still breaking records for the number of recruiters coming to campus to talk with students.

          At one job fair in March alone more than 100 recruiters talked with colleges students from across the Charleston area, including many of the 298 seniors at The Citadel.

          "The number of recruiters who come to our career fair each year continues to rise," Stewart said, adding that interest from recruiters goes well beyond the fabled Citadel alumni network.

          Stewart credits the combination of military training and the high caliber of academic instruction with producing graduates who are well qualified to handle workplace demands. While about a third of the senior class receives military commissions annually, the rest of the graduating cadets go to graduate school or into the job market.

          Many companies are waiting longer to hire, Stewart said, but firm job offers are coming in. The demand for civil engineering graduates remains strong. Accounting majors are in demand this year, too.

          "Recruiters who waited until April to visit have found that there are no civil engineering majors still looking for jobs," he said.

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