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Citadel News Service

For Release
April 30, 2002

More than 200 to get graduate and professional studies degrees

          The slogan "Arrive, Survive, Thrive" can be seen on posters all over campus, illustrating what it takes to make it through the cadet system at The Citadel. Those same words could be used loosely to describe evening students in its College of Graduate & Professional Studies (CGPS).

          Although CGPS is non-military and classes begin in the early afternoon and evening, most students make their way to The Citadel campus after a full day of work. Eighty-four percent of CGPS students attend graduate and undergraduate school part-time.

          This weekend, more than 200 CGPS students will receive their bachelors and masters degrees. Commencement services are at 2 p.m. Sunday, May 5 in McAlister Field House. Dr. Mary Thornley, president of Trident Technical College, will deliver the keynote address and will be presented with an honorary degree from The Citadel.

          The College of Graduate & Professional Studies was founded in 1966 as the Evening College. It still operates today under the same mission, "to serve the educational needs of the Lowcountry." Today, however, the college offers 20 graduate programs and three undergraduate programs."

          Heather Anderson, marketing and recruiting coordinator for CGPS said: "Anyone who has returned to school knows that it takes discipline, perseverance, and dedication to balance a job, family, and school. Those are a few of the same words we use when describing successful cadet life."

          Associate Dean Pat Ezell said CGPS enrollment continues to grow. Overall, CGPS enrollment is up 8 percent from last year. The Master's in Business Administration program is up 7 percent from last spring semester and programs such as a masters in education with an emphasis in social science has had a whopping 168 percent increase from this time last year.

          "For a while, CGPS was a really well kept secret," Ezell said. "Today we have more than 1,000 degree seeking students working towards degrees."

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