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Citadel News Service

Office of Public Affairs

FOR RELEASE
February 16, 1999

Police Corps Comes to The Citadel


          The Citadel has been chosen as the site for the South Carolina Police Corps. Sponsored by the Department of Justice, there are only two established programs in the country that have graduated officers, one in Linthicum, Md., the other in Portland, Ore. Twenty-four states, including South Carolina, are in the process of starting up similar programs.

          The program was established in response to a move for improvement in law enforcement. The goal of the program is to graduate specialized officers who are better educated and who have been trained, not only in traditional police sciences, but also in non-traditional police sciences, using a community-oriented policing strategy which will include training in social issues.

          The Police Corps, a product of the 1994 Crime Bill, recruits college sophomores and juniors with superior academic, physical fitness, and character qualifications. Similar to ROTC, Police Corps participants are given up to $30,000 for college expenses in exchange for a 4-year commitment to serve as police officers after college. Police departments qualify to hire graduates based on need for additional police officers. Financially these departments benefit because of the reduced costs of hiring and training Police Corps officers. In addition, participating departments receive $10,000 a year for each Police Corps officer's first four years.

          S.C. Police Corps participants will complete two rigorous eight-week training sessions which will be held on The Citadel campus with the first session to take place the summer after their junior year, and the second, after graduation from college. Training focuses on ethics, physical fitness for life, and traditional as well as non-traditional police sciences.

          Major Glenn S. Youngblood, formerly of the Charleston Police Department, has been appointed director of the S.C. Police Corps and Lieutenants Lillian Jeter and Richard Vance will serve as the program's deputy directors.

          The Police Corps is administered through the South Carolina Department of Public Safety. Department of Public Safety Director Boykin Rose said, "The Citadel is an excellent location for the program because The Citadel and the Police Corps both strive to instill in their graduates the same basic ingredients: honor, integrity, physical fitness, and discipline."

          Citadel President Major General John S. Grinalds said this about being selected to host the Police Corps: "The Citadel is pleased to have been chosen. Clearly, the union of the Police Corps and the Corps of Cadets will offer great benefits for both the college and the community."

 

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