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Citadel News Service

Office of Public Affairs

FOR RELEASE
February 2, 1999

 

Nobel Laureate to Speak at Citadel

          Douglas D. Osheroff, 1996 Nobel Laureate in Physics, will speak at The Citadel as part of the 1999 Distinguished Physics Lectures. Osheroff’s first talk, Superfluidity in He3: The Discovery Through the Eyes of a Graduate Student, will be on March 16. A second talk, From Aberdeen, Washington to Stockholm, Sweden: My Journey of a Lifetime, will take place on March 17. Both lectures begin at 8:00 p.m. in Graham Copeland Auditorium in Grimsley Hall on The Citadel campus and are free and open to the public.

          Osheroff was born in Aberdeen, Washington. He attended Cal Tech as an undergraduate and Cornell as a graduate student. In 1973, he received his PhD from Cornell and began working for AT&T Bell Laboratories, and in 1987 he accepted a faculty position at Stanford University. Former chair of the Stanford physics department, he has received the Buckley Condensed Matter Physics Prize and the Walter J. Gores Award for Excellence in Teaching. He was a MacArthur Prize Fellow and he shared the 1996 Nobel Prize for Physics.

          In the Superfluidity in He3, Osheroff will reminisce about his participation in the discovery of the three superfluid phases of liquid He3 when he was a graduate student. In From Aberdeen, Washington to Stockholm, Sweden: My Journey of a Lifetime, Osheroff will describe his life and his work; this presentation will conclude with a question and answer session.

          The Distinguished Physics Lectures series is funded by grants from The Citadel Development Foundation. For more information, please contact The Citadel Department of Physics at (843) 953-5122.

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