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Handbook

Curriculum | Tutorials | Requirements | Good Standing Academic Probation |

Discharge from the Program | Honors Ribbons | Freshmen Honors Courses |

Sophomore Honors Courses | Upper-Level Honors Courses |

Honors Program Recognition | Commencement Luncheon | Seminar Room |

Southern Regional Honors Council Conference | Priority Registration |

Scholarship | Opportunities | Liberal Arts and Social Science Checklist |

Science and Engineering Checklist | Certificate Checklist | Covenant |

 

 

 

 

 


 

Honors Program Curriculum

 

The Honors Program is designed to provide an exceptionally broad background of cultural knowledge and learning skills which students can then apply to their chosen areas of academic specialization. Most of the Honors Program curriculum will come in courses designed to be taken in lieu of Core Curriculum requirements, and most will, therefore, be taken in the freshman and sophomore years. The other Honors courses will take the place of General Electives, although in some cases individual departments may accept them as Departmental Electives.

 

The emphasis in Honors Program courses will be not primarily acceleration, but enrichment. They will go into extra depth, examining more closely the significance and implications of the material studied or presenting that material in a broader cultural context. In general, it is expected that Honors courses will employ discussion in order to establish habits of rigorous inquiry and intellectual independence.

 

The plan behind the curriculum is to create an environment of learning in which the students' intellectual habits can be formed. The patterns and processes of intellectual and scholarly inquiry will be taught, not merely the results of other people's having conducted that inquiry.

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Honors Tutorials

 

Each Honors course will have a tutorial foundation. Individual students, or sometimes small groups, will meet with their instructors frequently-usually, once every week-to discuss and develop ongoing writing, research, and laboratory projects. Tutorials will be arranged at a time mutually convenient for the student and professor.

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Curricular Requirements

 

Students majoring in mathematics, science or engineering will be required to complete the following Honors courses:

--Honors Personal and Professional Development I, II, III

--Honors English I, II, III, and IV

--Honors History I and II

--Honors Mathematics I and II

--Honors Social Science Project

--One Honors Seminar or Research Project

 

Students majoring in one of the liberal arts or social sciences will be required to complete the following Honors courses:

--Honors Personal and Professional Development I, II, III

--Honors English I, II, III, and IV

--Honors History I and II

--Honors Social Science Project

--Two Honors Seminars or Research Projects (or one of each)

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Good Standing Academic Probation

 

To remain in good standing, students in the Honors Program must maintain at least a 3.0 in their Honor courses and a 2.8 overall. The Honors Council will review the records of all Honors students after each semester and take appropriate action. Students who fall below these standards may be discharged from the Honors Program or placed on Academic Probation.

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Discharge from the Honors Program

 

Honors Program students are expected to uphold the highest standards of The Citadel in terms of scholarship, integrity, leadership, and behavior. They are expected to be role models for the Corps. Students who fall egregiously short of these standards are subject to discharge from the program.

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Honors Ribbons

 

Students in the Honors Program are entitled to wear ribbons on their cadet uniforms. Freshmen will receive a plain burgundy ribbon. Sophomores will receive a burgundy ribbon with one gold star. Juniors will receive a burgundy ribbon with two gold stars. Seniors will receive a burgundy ribbon with three gold stars.

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Freshman Honors Courses

 

HONR 100

Honors Tutorial

(no credit)

All Honors freshmen will be enrolled in HONR 100 to remind them of their commitment to engage seriously in the spirit of the tutorials which are a part of every Honors course. HONR 100 will meet at the student's tutorial time, which will be worked out with the professor after the semester has started.

 

HONR 101 and 102

Honors English I & II: The Aesthetic Context

(3 credit hours each semester)

This sequence will introduce students to the artistic achievements, chiefly literary, of Western and possibly some non-Western cultures, within the context of their major intellectual and ideological currents. Techniques of prose composition will be taught as the students engage these issues in writing.

 

[Note: Students enrolled in the Honors Program may meet the college's Core Curriculum requirements in freshman English by successfully completing HONR 101 and 102 ("Composition and Literature"). Students who successfully complete the first semester of the Honors Program will be allowed to enroll in ENGL 102 and may fulfill their Core Curriculum requirement in Freshman English by successfully completing that course.]

 

HONR 103 and 104

Honors History I & II: The Social, Political, and Historical Context

(3 credit hours each semester)

This sequence will introduce students to the social, political, and historical events involved in the development of Western and possibly some non-Western cultures, emphasizing the interplay between the way people of the past saw themselves and the universe and the way they shaped their environment.

 

[Note: Students enrolled in the Honors Program may meet the college's Core Curriculum requirement in history by successfully completing HONR 103 and 104 ("Honors History: The Social, Political, and Historical Context") in lieu of HIST 103 and 104 ("History of Western Civilization"). If a student successfully completes the first semester of Honors History and then ceases participation in the Honors Program, the student may complete the Core Curriculum requirement in history by completing HIST 104 (the second semester of "History of Western Civilization").]

 

HONR 131 and 132

Honors Mathematics I & II: The Analytic Context

(4 credit hours each semester)

This sequence will teach the Calculus within the context of its development from the civilization which produced it and its impact on civilization since. Topics covered will closely match those in MATH 131 and MATH 132.

Prerequisite for HONR 132: C or higher in HONR 131 or B or higher in MATH 131.

 

[Note: Students enrolled in the Honors Program may meet the college's Core Curriculum requirement in mathematics by successfully completing HONR 131 and 132 ("Honors Mathematics: The Analytic Context") in lieu of Math 131 and 132 ("Analytic Geometry and Calculus I and II"), MATH 105 and 106 ("College Mathematics I and II"), MATH 106 and 107 ("College Mathematics II and III"), or MATH 106 and 160 ("College Mathematics II" and "Statistical Methods"). Students who successfully complete the first semester of Honors Mathematics and then cease to participate in the Honors Program can fulfill the Core Curriculum requirements in mathematics by completing MATH 105, MATH 107, MATH 132, or MATH 160.]

 

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Sophomore Honors Courses

 

 

HONR 201 and 202

Honors English III & IV: Studies in British and American Literature

(3 credit hours each semester)

This sequence will teach one or more themes, genres, modes, schools, periods, or authors in British and American literature. The techniques of prose composition will be reinforced and developed.

 

[Note: Students majoring in English will be required to complete ENGL 203 and 204 ("Survey of British Literature"). In that case, HONR 201 will satisfy the departmental requirement that its majors take either ENGL 211 or 212, and HONR 202 will count as an English Elective.]

 

[Note: Students enrolled in the Honors Program may meet the college's Core Curriculum requirement in sophomore English by successfully completing HONR 201 and 202 ("Studies in British and American Literature") in lieu of ENGL 201 and 202 ("Major British Writers"). Students who successfully complete the first semester of sophomore Honors English and then cease participation in the Honors Program will be allowed to enroll in ENGL 202, ENGL 215, ENGL 218, or ENGGL 219 and may fulfill the sophomore Core Curriculum requirement in English by successfully completing one of these courses.]

 

 

HONR 203

Honors Social Science Project

(3 credit hours)

This course will include an interdisciplinary, integrative group project in the social sciences, drawing upon the context provided by the freshman Honors sequences. Students may meet the college's Core Curriculum Social Science requirement by completing this one-semester course.

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Upper-Level Honors Courses

 

 

HONR 300

Honors Seminar: Special Topics

(3 credit hours)

Often interdisciplinary, this seminar will investigate a field of study not addressed-at least, not in much detail-within the framework of the normal curriculum. It will be suitable for students in all majors. Topics will vary from semester to semester.

 

HONR 400 and 401

Honors Directed Research Project

(3 credit hours each semester)

Junior or seniors conduct research under the direction of faculty members. The research need not be original with the student but may be part of a project which the faculty member is currently conducting or has conducted in the past. An extra-departmental second reader or evaluator will be required for all projects. See Dr. Rhodes before you enroll in this course.

 

Multi-Level Honors Courses

 

HONR 211, 311, and 411

Honors Personal and Professional Development I, II, and III

(3 credit hours upon completion of 411)

Taught entirely in tutorial, this sequence directs students in a three-year period of research and writing on the subject of their professional goals, encouraging them to envision their leadership in their future professions and guiding them in exploring through research and writing the ideals as well as the facts of that profession. Three credit hours will be granted upon completion of HONR 411. This sequence is to be taken in the fall of the year, beginning with 211 in the fall of the sophomore year.

 

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Honors Program Recognition

 

 

 

Students who complete all Honors Program requirements will be recognized as Honors Program graduates in their college commencement ceremony. They will receive an Honors Program certificate plus an Honors Seal on their Citadel diploma. A notation will be added to their official college transcript to indicate they have completed the requirements of the Honors Program.

 

Students admitted to the Honors Program after their first semester at The Citadel will be required to complete at least 18 semester hours of Honors courses, plus HONR 211, 311, and 411. They will be recognized as Honors Program Graduates in their commencement ceremony, and a notation will be added to their official college transcript to indicate that they have fulfilled the requirements of the Honors Program. Unlike Honors students who have completed the full program, they will not receive an Honors Seal on their diploma.

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Honors Commencement Luncheon

 

On the Friday before The Citadel's commencement day, a rather unceremonious-but-nonetheless-nice luncheon will be held to recognize those who have completed Honors Program requirements. Parents will be invited and Honors Program certificates will be awarded.

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Honors Seminar Room

 

Our Seminar Room can seat up to 28 people in a horseshoe or roundtable style. The room is equipped with an overhead projector and screen, and when not being used as a classroom it may be used for group or individual study or just to take a break. The Seminar Room is located on the 3rd floor of Bond Hall (Room 368). It is available for use by Honor Students days, evenings and weekends.

 

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Southern Regional Honors Council Conference

 

 

 

In the spring semester (usually March or April), freshmen in the Honors Program are eligible to attend the Southern Regional Honors Conference. Sometimes upperclassmen participate, as well, by making presentations at these conferences.

 

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Priority Registration

 

Honors Program students qualify for Priority Registration. Since you will get the first shot at signing up for classes, the sections you want aren't likely to be filled. However, we must follow the procedures for Priority Registration established through the Registrar's Office. Here's how it will work:

 

Using the PAWS system, you, yourself, will enter your own schedule into The Citadel's computer registration system. You will need to meet with your Faculty Advisor to work out your academic schedule. He or she will give you your registration ticket, which will include your 4-digit registration code for access into the PAWS computer registration system. As an Honors Program student, you get the earliest possible time to schedule your classes. The sooner you can get your schedule entered the better, though, especially if you want to get into any courses that will be difficult to land, such as Fine Arts.

 

Once your priority registration process is completed, then you can happily sit on your hands, secure in the knowledge that you're all set for next semester, instead of scrambling to get your schedule worked out during the normal registration time.

 

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Scholarship

 

Truman Scholarship

This pays up to $30,000 towards two years of graduate study at an institution of the student's own choosing. Applicants should intend to pursue a life of public service, changing for the better the way our government serves the people at any level-local, state, or federal. Candidates need to apply by their junior year and need a 3.7-4.0 GPA. Up to 85 scholarships are awarded annually. A record of public service is required for a candidate to be successful.


Marshal Scholarship

This pays all fees and living expenses for a student to take a degree at any participating university in the United Kingdom (Great Britain, Northern Ireland, Scotland, and Wales). Applicants should have a 3.7-4.0 GPA and a specific plan for studying in the U.K. Up to 40 scholarships are awarded annually.

 

Goldwater Fellowship

This pays $15,000 towards graduate study for students intending to pursue a career in mathematics, the natural sciences, or engineering. Students who plan to study medicine are eligible only if they plan a research career rather than a career as a medical doctor in a private practice.

 

Fulbright Fellowship
This pays expenses for a student to live in a foreign country of his or her choosing for a year. Applicants are required to develop a statement of proposed study to justify their travel to the selected country. Individual countries have specific and varying requirements for their Fulbright participants, which applicants should study carefully. A detailed list can be obtained from Dr. Rhodes. A 3.3 GPA or so is required. Approximately 650 awards are made annually.

 

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Opportunities

 

National Security Education Program Scholarship
This pays part-to-all fees associated with a study-abroad program for the summer, for one semester, or for an academic year. Applicants should intend a career international in scope, with some government service required. Preference will be given to applications for study in areas of the world deemed critical to national security. Maximum award: $10,000 per semester for up to two semesters.

 


Rotary Scholarships
This provides for one year of study in any foreign country where a Rotary Club is located. For a post-graduate grant, you must apply in your junior year. Talk to Dr. Gary Nichols (History Dept.) about this one, in consultation with Dr. Rhodes. Sometimes these go untaken. Stipend: $25,000.


Madison Fellowship
This provides $24,000 towards graduate study in history, political science, or social studies for people interested in pursuing a career teaching secondary school.


National Science Foundation Fellowship
This pays $13,500 in living expenses, plus tuition and fees, for graduate study and research leading to master's or doctoral degrees in the mathematical, physical, biological, engineering, and behavioral and social sciences.


Gates Cambridge Scholarships
This pays for one year post-graduate work or a second Bachelor's at The University of Cambridge. It generally covers university and college fees at the applicable rates, a maintenance allowance sufficient for a single student, and a further discretionary allowance and airfare.

 

Jacob K. Javits Fellowship
This provides graduate fellowships leading to a doctoral degree or Master of Fine Arts. Fields of study: the arts, humanities and social sciences. Average grant: $28,857.

 

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Gold Honors Seal on Citadel Diploma
Liberal Arts and Social Sciences Majors

 

All three required:

HONR 211: Honors Personal &

Professional Development I ____

 

HONR 311: Honors Personal &

Professional Development II ____

 

HONR 411: Honors Personal &

Professional Development III ____

 

*To be taken in fall semesters,

beginning sophomore year

 

Two required:

HONR 300: Honors Seminar ____

OR

HONR 400: Research Project ____

HONR 300: Honors Seminar ____

OR

HONR 400: Research Project ____

OR

HONR 401: Research Project ____

 

 All four required:

HONR 101: Honors English I ___

 

HONR 102: Honors English I ___

 

HONR 201: Honors English III___

 

HONR 202: Honors English IV___

 

Both required:

HONR 103: Honors History I ___

 

HONR 104: Honors History II ___

 

 
 
 
Required:

HONR 203: Honors Social Science Project ___

*Only offered one semester a year

 

 
 
Note: Please notify Dr. Rhodes if you have switched from the Gold Honors Seal track to the Certificate track.
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Gold Honors Seal on Citadel Diploma
Science and Engineering Majors

 

 

 

All three required:

HONR 211: Honors Personal &

Professional Development I ____

 

HONR 311: Honors Personal &

Professional Development II ____

 

HONR 411: Honors Personal &

Professional Development III ____

 

*To be taken in fall semesters,

beginning sophomore year

 

One required:

HONR 300: Honors Seminar ____

OR

HONR 400: Research Project ____

OR

HONR 401: Research Project ____

 

All four required:

HONR 101: Honors English I ___

 

HONR 102: Honors English I ___

 

HONR 201: Honors English III___

 

HONR 202: Honors English IV___

 

Both required:

HONR 131: Honors Math I ___

 

HONR 132: Honors Math II ___

 

Both required:

HONR 103: Honors History I ___

 

HONR 104: Honors History II ___

 

Required:

HONR 203: Honors Social Science Project ___

*Only offered one semester a year

 

Note: Please notify Dr. Rhodes if you have switched from the Gold Honors Seal track to the Certificate track.

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Honors Program Certificate Requirements

 

Certificate Track

(For students who added to the program)

 

Required of everyone:

HONR 211: Honors Personal & Professional Development I ___________

HONR 311: Honors Personal & Professional Development II ___________

HONR 411: Honors Personal & Professional Development III ___________

 

PLUS

 

Six courses from the following list: 

HONR 101: Honors English I ___________

 

HONR 102: Honors English II ___________

 

HONR 103: Honors History I ___________

HONR 104: Honors History II ___________

 

HONR 131: Honors Mathematics I ___________

HONR 132: Honors Mathematics II ___________

 

HONR 201: Honors English III ___________

HONR 202: Honors English IV ___________

 

HONR 203: Honors Social Science Project ___________

 

HONR 300: Honors Seminar ___________

HONR 400: Research Project ___________

HONR 401: Research Project ___________

 

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Covenant of Excellence


I pledge never to give anything less
than my best effort

in pursuit of my educational goals.
For me, good enough will not be good enough.
I have the ability to achieve excellence,
and I will not be satisfied until I do.

 

 

When I am tired, I will persevere.
When I am discouraged,
I will seek encouragement
from my colleagues and teachers.
When others fail, I will not give up.
And when I succeed,
I will savor the sweetness of joy.

 

 

 

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