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Thoughts from Alumni

The Citadel's Honor Committee invites alumni to share experiences they have had in their lives after The Citadel that exemplifies Mr. Conroy's quote about the Honor Code. Please send your experiences that reflect how Honor truly is "movable goods" to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

 

Pat Conroy, Class of 1967

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"The Honor Code is movable goods, as it travels with you all your life. It is the part of The Citadel education that is deathless and not for sale."

 

Brigadier General R.M. Lake USMC, Class of 1977

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Doing the right thing involves determining what the right thing is and then doing it. The bigger challenge is usually finding the willingness to do the right thing. My experience with the Honor Code at The Citadel provided me with two great lessons. First, it gave me a standard I could use to help me decide what is right both as Cadet and in the military. Second, it gave me the invaluable opportunity to practice doing the right (but often tough) thing. (Brigadier General Lake was Professor of Naval Science 2004-2005, The Citadel)

 

Colonel J.M. Dorton USA (Ret), Class of 1964

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Honor is more than just a word. It is even more than a code of ethical conduct. It is (or should be) a way of life. That is what The Citadel tries to imbue in its cadets and ultimately in its graduates. A person should not lie, cheat, or steal, nor tolerate those who do anywhere, any time, for any reason. Those who live by such a code are seen to be honorable people who can be trusted to stand steadfast by their commitments. True success in life is measured by the respect of others and to be respected because you are known to be "an honorable person who will stand by their word, actions and commitments" is the greatest respect and reward anyone can attain.

This college and its Honor Code ingrained this in me from day one of plebe year, through my senior year as a cadet Company Honor Representative, through thirty years of military duty to our country, and for the rest of my life. Honor is a way of life for responsible people. It should always be manifest even when no other person, being, or thing is present or affected. (Colonel Dorton is a former Battalion Tactical Officer, The Citadel)

 

D. Alan Floyd, CPA, Class of 1979

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Honor is your best friend. When people know that you are honest, they will place a confidence and trust in you that will make your life much easier. They will be eager to do business with you, you will always get the benefit of the doubt, your friends and business associates will tend to be honorable people and you will lead a life with much less stress. You should guard your honor with fervor; only one lapse will cause you a lifetime of problems from those who know about it. I am grateful to The Citadel for its dedication to the teaching of honor.

 

John I. Moore, Jr., Class of 1970

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Of all the institutions and traditions at The Citadel, none has had a more profound impact on my life since graduation than the simple phrase we call the Honor Code. It is the soul of The Citadel education. (John Moore is Professor and Head, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, The Citadel, Phone: 843-953-7882)