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Course Catalog

Below is a listing of all courses offered in the English graduate programs.

ENGL 500 Old and Middle English Literature (3)
A study of Beowulf, other Old English poems, and Old English prose in translation; and also a study of such Middle English works as Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Pearl, Piers Plowman, the Ancrene Riwle, The Owl and the Nightingale, and other romances, lyrics, and drama. Most of the Middle English is read in the original. (Chaucer is excluded.)

ENGL 501 Chaucer (3)
A study of Chaucer's language, art, and cultural milieu through the reading of Troilus and Criseyde, the Canterbury Tales, and many of the shorter works.

ENGL 502 Shakespeare (3)
A comprehensive study of Shakespeare's art, including an intensive reading of several plays and appropriate attention to the primary critical approaches.

ENGL 503 English Drama to 1642 (3)
A study of English drama from its origins in the Middle Ages, through the predecessors and contemporaries of Shakespeare, and on to the closing of the theatres in 1642.

ENGL 504 Poetry and Prose of the English Renaissance (3)
Non-dramatic poetry and prose of the 16th and early 17th centuries, with emphasis on the major authors (Spenser, Sidney, Marlowe, Jonson, Donne, and Herbert) and on the major literary types.

ENGL 505 Milton (3)
A study of the major poetry, selected prose, and selected minor poems with emphasis on Paradise Lost.

ENGL 506 Restoration and Eighteenth Century Drama (3)
A study of such important dramatists of the period as Otway, Etherege, Wycherley, Dryden, Congreve, Vanbrugh, Farquhar, Goldsmith, Sheridan, and others.

ENGL 507 Survey of Restoration and Eighteenth Century Literature (3)
A study of Dryden, Swift, Pope, Johnson, Blake, and other important poets and prose writers of the period.

ENGL 509 Romantic Literature (3)
A study of the chief features of the Romantic writings of the early 19th century, with special emphasis on Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats.

ENGL 510 Victorian Literature (3)
A study of English literature from 1832 to 1900 and of major writers such as Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, Carlyle, Swinburne, and Rossetti.

ENGL 512 Southern Literature (3)
A study of the best literature written in the South from the time of William Byrd to the present. The focus will be on the "Southern Renaissance," with special attention given to the Fugitive Poets and William Faulkner.

ENGL 516 Continental Literature (3)
A study of European literature in translation since the Renaissance, including works by such authors as Cervantes, Moliere, Racine, Goethe, Stendhal, Balzac, Tolstoy, Dostoyevski, and important writers of the 20th century.

ENGL 517, 518 Special Topics in Literature (3, 3)
A study of a special author, period, topic, or problem in literature which is outside the routine offerings of the department. The subject for each course will be announced.

ENGL 520 A Survey of World Literature I (3)
Masterpieces of world literature in translation from the Vedic literature to Racine with special attention to the philosophical content and the development of literary forms.

ENGL 521 A Survey of World Literature II (3)
Masterpieces of world literature in translation from Voltaire to the present time with special attention to the philosophical content and the development of literary forms.

ENGL 522 Colonial and Revolutionary American Literature (3)
A detailed study of major American writers from the earliest settlers through the end of the 18th century.

ENGL 523 Nineteenth Century American Literature I--Romanticism (3)
A study of major figures of the American Romantic period (approximately 1830-1860), including Emerson, Thoreau, Poe, Hawthorne, and Melville.

ENGL 524 Nineteenth Century American Literature II--Realism (3)
A study of major figures of the American Realistic period (approximately 1860-1900), including Whitman, Dickinson, James, Howells, Twain, and Crane.

ENGL 525 Eighteenth Century British Novel (3)
A study of the origins of the British novel, including such figures as Fielding, Richardson, and Defoe.

ENGL 526 Victorian Novel (3)
A study of major British novelists of the late 19th century, including Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy.

ENGL 527 British Fiction 1900 to 1945 (3)
A study of the novels and short stories of major British writers from the first half of the 20th Century, including such figures as Conrad, Lawrence, Forster, Woolf, and Joyce.

ENGL 528 American Fiction 1900 to 1945 (3)
A study of the novels and short stories of major American writers from the first half of the 20th Century, including such figures as Fitzgerald, Wolfe, Faulkner, and Hemingway.

ENGL 529 American Fiction Since 1945 (3)
A study of significant American novels and short fiction published since World War II.

ENGL 530 Special Topics in Humanities (3)
A study of special areas of the humanities or related areas which are outside the normal course offerings of the English Department. The subject for each course will be announced.

ENGL 531 British Poetry 1900 to Present (3)
A study of the poetry of major 20th-century British authors, such as Hardy, Yeats, Thomas, and Auden.

ENGL 532 American Poetry 1900 to Present (3)
A study of the poetry of major 20th-century American authors, such as Eliot, Pound, Stevens, Williams, and Frost.

ENGL 533 British Drama 1900 to Present (3)
A study of the work of major 20th-century British dramatists, such as Shaw, Pinter, Stoppard, and Beckett.

ENGL 534 American Drama 1900 to Present (3)
A study of the work of major 20th-century American dramatists, such as O'Neill, Williams, Miller, and Albee.

ENGL 535 African American Literature (3)
A survey of African American literature from the early days of slavery to the struggle for emancipation, to the twentieth century Harlem Renaissance and civil rights movement.

ENGL 537 Contemporary British Literature (3)
A study of post-World War II British writers.

ENGL 550, 551 Special Topics in Composition or Language (3)
A study of a special author, period, topic, or problem in composition or language which is outside the routine offerings of the department. The subject for each course will be announced.

ENGL 552 Literature for Adolescents (3)
A study of literature for the adolescent, including methods of introducing the major literary genres to the secondary school student.

ENGL 553 Modern English Grammar (3)
A study of the forms and functions of words, morphology, and syntax. The course includes a study of the conceptual basis of language and the way in which grammar generates meaning.

ENGL 554 History of the English Language (3)
A historical survey of the development of Old, Middle, and Modern English. The course begins with a study of Indo-European languages and traces the development of the English language through major phonological, morphological, and syntactic changes; some attention is given to dialectical variations and semantic changes.

ENGL 555 Literary Criticism (3)
A study of the major theories of how to understand literature and practical application of the theories to particular works of literature.

ENGL 556 Theory and Practice of Teaching Composition (3)
A study of traditional and contemporary theories of the composition process and applications of those theories to teaching composition.

ENGL 557 Creative Writing--Poetry (3)
Class discussion of student writing using 20th-century poems as models.

ENGL 558 Technical and Professional Writing (3)
Principles and practice of technical communication as applied to reports, technical papers, oral presentations, and business communications.

ENGL 559 History and Theory of Rhetoric (3)
A study of language as a means of winning the assent, sympathy, or cooperation of an audience. Includes contemporary rhetorical theory and its development from classical rhetoric.

ENGL 560: Film Studies (3)
This film course will expose students to films from a variety of nations and filmmakers that represent the chief cinematic movements of the twentieth century (Weimar Expressionism, French New Wave, American noir, etc.), and it will instruct students in the terminology and techniques of filmmaking. The students will, by studying the relationship between the tools of filmmaking and the finished products, learn to "read" films as metaphors of reality.

ENGL 562 Workshop in Advanced Composition (3)
The study and practice of advanced writing techniques. This course fulfills state teacher certification requirements for advanced composition.

ENGL 563 Creative Writing--Fiction (3)
Class discussion of student writing using 20th-century short stories as models.

ENGL 570: Topics in African American literary genres (3)
A study of a particular genre of African American literature, such as drama, novels, or poetry. Topics will vary according to instructors.

ENGL 571: Topics in African American literary periods (3)
A study of a particular period of African American literature, such as the Harlem Renaissance. Topics will vary according to instructors.

ENGL 572: Topics in Major African American Writers (3)
A study of a particular African American writer, such as Langston Hughes or Toni Morrison. Topics will vary according to instructors.

ENGL 573: Special Topics in African American Literature (3)
A study of a specific topic in African American literature that is not a genre, period, or individual writer. Topics will vary according to instructor.

ENGL 650 Principles of Literary Research (3)
Study of textual bibliography, research methods and resources, and methods of presenting research.

ENGL 698 Tutorial (3)
Individual study of a given topic following a syllabus of readings, papers, and other requirements prescribed by a faculty member.

ENGL 699 Independent Study (3)
Individual study of an agreed-upon topic under the direction of a faculty member but following a course of reading and other requirements proposed by the student and established by negotiation with the director.

ENGL 700 Seminar (3)
Individual research into a scholarly or critical problem in literature, composition, or language. Progress, methods, and results will be shared with the class by presentation and discussion and will lead to the preparation of a single long paper.

ENGL 701 Thesis (6)
Six credit hours for completion of a formal master's thesis under faculty direction.

ENGL 702 Internship (1-3)
A supervised, field experience in which the student observes and participates in a professional occupation related to the English degree, such as publishing, technical writing, or teaching. The internship will consist at least 40 hours of work per credit hour earned and the completion of a formal report. Permission of the graduate director required. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.