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Citadel News Service
3 Nov 2010

Criminal Justice cadets attend international conference

Eight cadets in The Citadel Criminal Justice Society attended the International Association of Chiefs of Police conference held recently in Orlando, Fla.

Photo
Cadet Alison Hayes used a new small arms tactical training system during the International Association of Chiefs of Police conference held recently in Orlando, Fla.

The event included an expo featuring more than 750 law enforcement vendors and guest speakers including Florida Attorney General Bill McCollum, Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer, and Orlando Police Chief Val B. Demings. Other conference speakers included Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano, FBI Director Robert Mueller and Vice President Joe Biden. All discussed the role that the federal government plays in assisting local and state agencies in the global war on terror.
Cadets attending the conference were Joe Antwine, Nick Bosak, Alison Hayes, James Hough, Robert Hodges, Claybourne Lee Roberts, and William Amendolare. In addition to Citadel cadets, law enforcement from 48 countries and numerous agencies, including Homeland Security, the Drug Enforcement Agency, Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms, The FBI, Air Marshal Service and the U.S Marshal Service, were represented at the conference.

“All of them were more than willing to share their experiences and their admiration for their respective agencies,” said Cadet Antwine, president of the Citadel Criminal Justice Society.

Advancement in law enforcement technology was a highlight for the cadets.

“The technological advancements in law enforcement are astounding,” Antwine said. “There is a new computer system that has only one monitor, one key board, and a joystick and it combines every function in the police car from the blinkers to the sirens to the radar. The astonishing part was that the electronics could fit into less than eight cubic feet of space and could be mounted underneath the rear of the vehicle allowing for more space in the cab and no loss of space in the trunk.“

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